Have you ever kept African Dwarf Frogs (ADF) and what was your experience like?

They can be on both land and water while making excellent aspects to any species only or community aquarium.
Avery
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Have you ever kept African Dwarf Frogs (ADF) and what was your experience like?

Post by Avery » July 6th, 2019, 3:00 am

There are only a limited number of amphibians that you can keep inside of the average sized aquarium, and even a smaller handful that are sold at local and big box aquarium stores. Out of those, is a little frog called the African Dwarf Frog (which spends all of it's time under water, only to swim up every few minutes to get a breath of air). Have you ever kept any of these little guys, and if so, what was your experience like?

I've personally kept these guys a few times, enough to learn about how to properly breed them, take care of the tadpoles, and even watch the tadpoles slowly turn into frogs and repeat the process. I must say, they are pretty fragile (many get what I call "red leg syndrome" where they have an internal bleeding issue and then die a few hours later), due to their poor eyesight it can be pretty hard for them to find food (even if it's in front of them) and eat it all, and lastly the tadpoles are even more fragile since the frogs think they are food. It's always super interesting to see them breed (since it looks like they are wrestling), and even cooler to hear a high pitched noise come from the males who sing to the females in order to let them know they are ready to mate. The only way I was able to get them to successfully breed, was to have a small 5.5 gallon species only tank with about 4 of them and some live plants, since it was hard for them to get comfortable and be out in the open with shadows from fish swimming above them.

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Post by v_danger_v » August 7th, 2019, 3:46 pm

I’ve never tried having them in my rank, but I think they are a super cool concept to have in a tank. Maybe a good 20 gallon long or so would be the best since you could get a good amount of them to breed. Not sure on their specific care requirements, but maybe a sand substrate with a ton of plants and/or wood so they can hide in (and allow for tannins to make the water darker to help them out too)?


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Elle1612
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Post by Elle1612 » August 13th, 2019, 12:35 am

I saw these at petsmart and wanted to get them so badly! are they hard to keep care of? you said they are super fragile, how can you tell the good ones from the bad ones ahead of time?

Avery
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Post by Avery » August 26th, 2019, 1:28 am

Elle1612 wrote:
August 13th, 2019, 12:35 am
I saw these at petsmart and wanted to get them so badly! are they hard to keep care of? you said they are super fragile, how can you tell the good ones from the bad ones ahead of time?
They aren't too hard to take care of, but the biggest thing is making sure they don't get red legs (bacteria infection that turns their leg red before they die), and that they get more than enough food (they are almost blind, and smell their food - sometimes it will legit take them 10-20mins to find the food resting on the substrate before they get it all).

It's hard to tell the good from the bad by looking, but they do require very specific water parameters (mostly just really, really clean water), and need for there not to be a big current at all. Plus, if you can, they don't like bright light - so using a dim light will let you see them out and about WAY more often than if you have a bright light and they find hiding spots.