Aqueon 40 Gallon Breeder Turtle Tank

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Avery
Administrators
Posts: 132
Joined: July 3rd, 2019, 11:30 pm
Answers: 22
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Aqueon 40 Gallon Breeder Turtle Tank

Post by Avery » May 13th, 2020, 2:15 am

Detailed Information

Tank: Aqueon 40 Gallon Breeder
Stand: Imagitarium Brooklyn Metal 40 Gallon Stand
Filter: Polar Aurora 265GPH Canister Filter (SunSun HW-30X Rebranded), Eheim Skim 350
Lighting: NICREW Submerisble LED Aquarium Strip (2x), ZooMed Aquatic Turtle Dual Dome Lighting (Combo UVB/UVA Bulb & Heating Bulb) - Supported by Exo Terra Light Bracket w/ Additional Adhesive Support Bracket

Substrate: Generic Black Sand
Flora: Anacharis (?x), Hornwort (1x)
Fauna: African Sideneck Turtle (1x), Pearl Danio (8x), Chinese Algae Eater (1x), Malaysian Trumpet Snails (?x)

Photography
I've setup each of the following text titles to be a rough sentence or two of what was added, changed, removed, or the status update. Just directly select on this to be brought to that specific post with the images added as attachments.

Setting Up & Adding Basking Area Hardscape (Driftwood)
Adding River Rocks & Additional Baking Support
Adding African Sideneck Turtle
Adding Live Plants & Fish

Avery
Administrators
Posts: 132
Joined: July 3rd, 2019, 11:30 pm
Answers: 22
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Post by Avery » May 15th, 2020, 1:15 am

Here is the current setup, with all of the driftwood attached together using stainless steel screws in order to hold them all in place (and make sure that it doesn't float when I fill it up with water). I'll be doing some additional tests once I fill this all of the way up with water to make sure that nothing floats and to make sure that it is easy enough for a turtle to be able to slide up into the basking area without any issues.

I slightly made the wood wet in order to make sure that the basking area could handle the wet driftwood (and also to make sure that once the wood is wet, I can screw in the wood a tad tighter as things loosen up). I choose black sand since I felt like it would be easier to find the turtle's poop, for the turtle to find it's food, and it also would blend in with the black stand and black tank trim.
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Avery
Administrators
Posts: 132
Joined: July 3rd, 2019, 11:30 pm
Answers: 22
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Post by Avery » May 23rd, 2020, 10:27 pm

With much of the free time that I have after work, I recently just added in some water to the tank overnight to verify that the driftwood doesn't float when filled up (as it has never been water logged thus far), the platform that I made is stable enough for the turtle to move around and climb on it, and also to make sure that the sand slow gets water logged since I dislike the fact of having to wait awhile before all of the sand particles slowly get fully wet (and to avoid the gas bubbles that are created when first filling up and when some of the sand doesn't actually get wet).

In doing so, I sadly notice that the platform is simply too high for my liking (trying to avoid the turtle being able to climb out of the tank when it gets bigger), the way that the turtle would have to get up makes little sense since when it's at a comfortable height the platform doesn't get fully dry (even with the heat lamp and UVA/B bulbs), and it appears that I can barely move my finger on it for the whole platform to shake (related to the water expanding the wood and requiring me to tighten the screws into the wood but also due to the way it is built with two supporting pieces). To fix the issues I've done the following;

  • Made sure to add a secondary piece of driftwood that will be on the right side only and at a nice angle for the turtle to be able to simply climb up like a more natural ramp.
  • Reduced the water level to allow for the main driftwood section to become fully dry while still having a vast majority of the wood in the water and fully submerged.
  • Everyone likes rocks with sand, so I added in some river rocks to provide a nice natural look while also having them provide some structural support to the pieces of wood so that they do not sway as much (note that they do still sway some slightly due to the screws in the wood, but it's 100% managed and shouldn't scare the turtle from trying to climb out).
Now I'm just awaiting for some time before adding in the turtle for the tank to fully cycle. I'll more than likely add in the turtle, and then slowly add in some live plants and fish for it to interact with (and if it ever needed/wanted to, use as a food source for when it gets hungry). Still TBH on the fish that I will introduce since I may want something challenging for it to capture if it ever does (adding to the more natural vibe of how it would be in the wild).
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