Gilbert Intermediate
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  • Member since Jun 22nd 2020
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Posts by Gilbert

    What about a plecostomus? Is there anyone out there that uses those?

    I’ve have a few, I think the biggest problem is that many tanks are just too small for their adult size, unless you get one of the smaller breeds (which still get around 6-8 inches long).



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    Honestly that is probably the smartest thing I haven’t done to my tank stand. I always use a flash light when I could of had both hands free the whole time. Thank you for the quick tip!



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    What are some of your go to methods that you use to kill off tanks that just have a huge snail infestation? I’ve heard of people trying to use the following (not in any specific order);


    1) dosing some medicine that has copper (assuming they don’t have any other invertebrates or sensitive fish)
    2) removing all plants and fish, then dosing high levels of salt
    3) adding on items like zucchini during the day and then taking it out at night to remove all of the snails, before repeating the following day
    4) adding in fish that hunt snails (pea puffers in small tanks, loaches in bigger tanks)



    What is your go to method and how has it panned out?



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    Thank you so much for the calendar, especially me using Tapatalk and having each event become a new thread on the community (it lets me see it and the given discussion on that event)!



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    Yeah I don’t personally recommend them either, if needed, just have a bunch of decorations or plants in order to let the fry hide during the night and pull the adults out once you are certain all of the fry have been released.



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    I’d so mostly flakes, along with wafers once a week for the bottom feeders (or for the fish who like algae).


    Pellets are good too but I’ve seen too many fish who overeat them before they expand, or if the pellets are too big, get them stuck in their jaw or mouth.



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    It’s back on! But I agree now with this being changed forever, might want to rename this thread possibly since people are going to get super confused. Plus @Petco already has noted this will be the case moving forward;


    “Thanks for your question! We have replaced our $1 per gallon sale with a 50% off Aqueon Open-Glass Tank Sale, so that we can include more tank options (yay!) We do not have any information on the next sale at this time, but please stay tuned! 🐡 🐠 🐟”



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    With all of the super cheap options out there, which ones do you use? I know there are like black diamond blasting sand (really just fine grit sand), some use pool filter sand,and others use playground sand. Are there any other options that you can use or that others use?



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    I feel like this is one of the more underrated questions and its answer can be hard, but how do you test the water current to make sure that it has proper flow in all areas (avoiding dead spots unless created underneath rocks) without creating areas that have way too much of a current?


    Is there any specific tests that can show if it’s strong, but not too strong for species who might wonder within or when they are sleeping? What’s the best location for corals based on water currents?



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    I know that this may sound crazy, but I swear I’ve seen it happen where I know a given livebearer was a female (pregnant and had fry), but then randomly got a gonopodium and then suddenly was acting like a male (trying to bread with females).


    Is this something that happens a bunch? And how is this even able to happen?



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    Mostly just use bioballs with a prefilter attached on the intake for my filter (I find that having filter pads within the filter works,but over time it slows down the flow pretty exponentially as there are debris that gets trapped).



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    In smaller tanks, I’d say it would be a lone species (thinking of Dwarf Gourami or Gourami). In bigger community tanks, I’d probably say a giant shoal of a tetra species. In a cichlid tank, it would more than likely be something that would stand out color wise.



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    Do you know of the DIY method they use? Is it cost effective and are there any like dangers using CO2?

    I know that people have used things like a plastic water bottle, some tubing, and then using yeast, baking soda and sugar to create the reaction that releases CO2. I know of a few friends who use this method, but it’s not as stable since the yeast and sugar only lasts so long before you need to toss it and make a new batch (and it doesn’t make as much CO2 compared to using like an actually bottle of CO2).



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